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Easy Basics: Project 028a Arduino, Bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06 ZS-40 / FC-114

of Acoptex.com in UNO

Basics: Project 028a

Project name: Bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06 ZS-40/FC-114

Attachments: HC_05_FC114_testsketch, HC_06_FC_114_testsketchHC05_ZS40_testsketchHC06_ZS40_testsketch

Tags: Bluetooth module HC-05, Bluetooth module HC-06, ZS-40, FC-114, AT commands

In this project, you needed these parts :

1.Aruduino Uno R3 (you can also use the other version of Arduino)

2.Arduino IDE ( you can download it from here  )

3.Jumper cables

4. Breadboard

5. Bluetooth modules HC-05 or HC-06 1 pc

6. Resistor 4 pcs (2pcs 1 KOhm and 2 pcs 2KOhm)

General

We will learn about bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06 and how to connect them to Arduino board.

Understanding the bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06

Bluetooth [WikiPedia] is a wireless technology standard for exchanging data over short distances (using short-wavelength UHF radio waves in the ISM band from 2.4 to 2.485 GHz) from fixed and mobile devices, and building personal area networks (PANs). Range is approximately 10 Meters (30 feet).

HC-05 ZS-40 and HC-06 ZS-40


HC-05 bluetooth module

Based on the EGBT-045MS Bluetooth module which is loaded with SPP (Serial Port Protocol) firmware for UART communication.

This module based on the Cambridge Silicon Radio BC417 2.4 GHz BlueTooth Radio chip. This is a complex chip which uses an external 8 Mbit flash memory. See more info here.

Includes a 3.3v voltage regulator and this allows the boards to accept a VCC of 3.6c to 6v on the main VCC pin/connector. However, the RX and TX pins are still 3.3v. The Arduino will accept 3.3v as a HIGH signal so the HC-05/06 TX pin (out) can be directly connected to a 5V Arduino. The HC-05/06 RX pin (in) cannot accept 5V though and should not be connected directly to an Arduino. A direct connection will work short term but it damages the small blue tooth module and eventually you will kill the RX pin. The 5V rom the Arduino has to be reduced in some way and a simple way to do this is by using a voltage divider made from 2 resistors - 1K ohm  and 2K ohm. 

The module has two modes of operation: Command Mode (We can send AT commands to it) and Data Mode (It transmits and receives data to another bluetooth module).

The trace between pin 31 and pin 24 on the breakout board links the status LED pin on the EGBT-045MS to the status LED pin on the EGBT-046S. The connection then goes to the actual LED on the breakout board. The connection between pin 31 and pin 24 allows the same breakout board to be used for both the EGBT-045MS and the EGBT-046S. 

The push button switch connects VCC (3.3v) to pin 34 and is used to put the EGBT-045MS / HC-05 in to AT mode. There are 2 AT modes, I refer to them as “mini mode” and “full mode”. Briefly pressing the button switch puts the modules in to mini mode and not all commands work. Keeping the switch closed puts the modules in to full AT mode where all AT commands work. Releasing the switch returns pin 34 LOW.

Pin 32 is LED2 on the EGBT-045MS/HC-05. Pin 32 is LOW when the module is not connected and HIGH when the module is connected. This gives us an easy way to determine if the HC-05 is actually connected or not. Connect the STATE pin to an Arduino digital pin and if digitalRead() returns HIGH you know the module has an active connection. You can, of course, connect an LED to the STATE pin as a visual indicator of a connection. Pulling the EN pin on the HC-05 LOW disables the module.

Specification:

  • Radio Chip: CSR BC417
  • Memory: External 8Mbit
  • FlashOutput Power: -4 to +6dbm Class 2
  • Sensitivity: -80dbm Typical
  • Bit Rate: EDR, up to 3Mbps
  • Interface: UART
  • Antenna: Built-in
  • Dimension: 27W x 13H mm
  • Voltage: 3.1 to 4.2VDC
  • Current: 40mA max

HC-06 bluetooth module

Based on the EGBT-046S Bluetooth module which is loaded with SPP (Serial Port Protocol) firmware for UART communication.

This module based on the Cambridge Silicon Radio BC417 2.4 GHz BlueTooth Radio chip. This is a complex chip which uses an external 8 Mbit flash memory. See more info here.

Includes a 3.3v voltage regulator and this allows the boards to accept a VCC of 3.6c to 6v on the main VCC pin/connector. However, the RX and TX pins are still 3.3v.The Arduino will accept 3.3v as a HIGH signal so the HC-05/06 TX pin (out) can be directly connected to a 5V Arduino. The HC-05/06 RX pin (in) cannot accept 5V though and should not be connected directly to an Arduino. A direct connection will work short term but it damages the small blue tooth module and eventually you will kill the RX pin. The 5V rom the Arduino has to be reduced in some way and a simple way to do this is by using a voltage divider made from 2 resistors - 1K ohm  and 2K ohm. 

The trace between pin 31 and pin 24 on the breakout board links the status LED pin on the EGBT-045MS to the status LED pin on the EGBT-046S. The connection then goes to the actual LED on the breakout board. The connection between pin 31 and pin 24 allows the same breakout board to be used for both the EGBT-045MS and the EGBT-046S. 

Most HC-06 modules do not have the button switch (the space is empty) and bringing pin 34 HIGH on the HC-06 does not do anything. From the above photo you can see that the STATE pin is connected to pin 32 and to pin 25 of the small blue tooth modules.

Specification:

  • Radio Chip: CSR BC417
  • Memory: External 8Mbit
  • FlashOutput Power: -4 to +6dbm Class 2
  • Sensitivity: -80dbm Typical
  • Bit Rate: EDR, up to 3Mbps
  • Interface: UART
  • Antenna: Built-in
  • Dimension: 27W x 13H mm
  • Voltage: 3.1 to 4.2VDC
  • Current: 40mA max

See EGBT-045MS and EGBT-046S data sheets here.

HC-05 bluetooth module vs HC-06 bluetooth module

They have similar hardwares but different firmwares. HC-06 bluetooth module can be only set as SLAVE. HC-05 bluetooth module can be set as SLAVE and as MASTER. This means the HC-05 can initiate a connection to another device and the HC-06 can only accept a connection from another device.

HC-06 does not have a button switch.

HC-06 only 4 header pins. Does not have the EN pin or the STATE pin.

HC-06 does not have pins 31-34 connected.

HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114

They share the same breakout board as the ZS-040 but have different pins soldered between the Bluetooth module and the breakout board and have a very different firmware.

The small push button switch still has traces to pin 34 and still pulls pin 34 HIGH, however, on the FC-114 boards, pin 34 is a regular IO pin and closing the button switch doesn’t do anything. On the ZS-040 boards, closing the button switch and pulling pin 34 HIGH puts the modules in to AT mode. Since the FC-114 starts in AT mode this is no big loss. When powered on, the modules report themselves as “AEGIN” and default to Slave Mode with a baud rate of 9600. The process for using them in Slave Mode, connecting to the Arduino and talking to an Android device, is the same as other modules. Like other HC-05s and HC-06s the boards have a voltage regular on the vcc pin and accept a voltage in of 3.6v to 6V, however, the other pins are 3.3v only. This means you can power the boards from a 5V rail using the vcc in but you should not connect the others pins directly to 5V.

HC-05 FC-114 does not have a separate AT mode like other HC-05s. On start up it is in Slave Mode and accepting commands. After a connection is made the module goes in to communication mode and AT commands no longer work. In communication mode anything the module receives is treated as data and sent to the connected device.The HC-06s use the same breakout board as the HC-05s but have some differences:  there is no button switch, there is no connector on the EN pin, there is no connector on the STATE pin. When the EN pin is pulled LOW (connected to ground) the modules are disabled. The STATE pin on the breakout boards connects to pin 25 and pin 32 on the small Bluetooth module. On the FC-114 pin 32 in a normal IO pin and pin 25 is MCU_INT. On the boards I received pin 25 was not connected to the breakout board and so the STATE pin was not connected. After connecting pin 25 to the breakout board the STATE pin works as expected; LOW when not connected and HIGH when connected. Tt appears that the HC-06 FC-114s have the same firmware as the HC-05 FC-114s. BLK-MD-BC04-B bluetooth data module used. The BLK-MD-BC04-B is a Bluetooth serial module for OEM manufacturers who want to implement Bluetooth functionality with their products cost effectively and also in timely manner. The BC04-B supports UART, USB, I2C, PCM, PIO interfaces for the communication with the OEM products.

The BC04-B is provided with Bluetooth v2.0 compatible firmware runs internally for SPP (Serial Port Profile) applications by default. It based on CSR BC04 External chipset with an antenna integrated and with the firmware provided by our company, it could be easily used for kinds of Bluetooth products.

The BC04-B is fully qualified with Bluetooth v.2.0+EDR specification so OEM manufacturers can save cost and time for overall OEM product certifications, which makes the BC04-B ideal solution for larger volume and cost sensitive applications.

Specifications:

  • Bluetooth protocol: Bluetooth Specification v2.0 + EDR
  • USB protocol: USB v1.1/2.0
  • Frequency: 2.4GHz ISM band
  • Modulation: GFSK (Gaussian Frequency Shift Keying)
  • Transmit power: ≤ 4dBm, Class 2
  • Sensitivity: ≤-84dBm at 0.1% BER
  • Rate: 2.1Mbps(Max)/160 kbps (Asynchronous); 1Mbps/1Mbps (Synchronous)
  • Security features: Authentication and encryption
  • Support profiles: Bluetooth serial port (master & slave)
  • Power Supply: +3.3 VDC 50mA
  • Operating temperature: -20 ~ +55 Centigrade
  • Dimensions: 26.9mm x 13mm x 2.2 mm

One thing to note is the power consumption; 3.3v at 50mA. I do not know if 50mA is constant or if it is the maximum the board can draw (likely it is the maximum) and this too much for a regular Arduino pin to supply so the modules should not be connected to a regular Arduino pin.

They can safely be powered from the Arduino 5V out but it is worth remembering that the 5V pin on can only supply up to to 200mA so if you are adding other devices/sensors you may need to be careful of the total current.

BLK-MD-BC04-B looks the same as the ones used in other HC-05s and HC-06s but the Bolutek firmware uses different pins.

– Pin 24 is for a status LED. This is connected to the LED on the breakout board.

– Pin 26 is reset. This is not connected.

– Pin 27 is used to determine if Master Mode can be selected in software or Hardware.

– Pin 28 is used to select Master or Slave through hardware.

Pin 26 reset:

– short press = memory clear

– Long press (3 seconds+) = restore default settings

If pin 27 is HIGH then we can set Master Mode in software. If pin 27 is LOW then we need to use hardware (pin 28) to select Master Mode.

When pin 27 is LOW (or not connected) pin 28 is used to selected either Slave Mode or Master Mode.

– Pin 27 LOW + pin 28 LOW = Slave Mode.

– Pin 27 LOW + pin 28 HIGH = Master Mode.

If you have pin 27 and pin 28 not connected so it means that you cannot set the modules to Master Mode in software.

Signals and connections of bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06

FC-114:

ZS-40:

ZS-040 and FC-114 boards differ from some of the other modules in that they have a EN pin rather than a KEY pin. SEE EXAMPLE BELOW.


HC-05 Pins:

  • KEY (EN): If brought HIGH before power is applied, forces AT Command Setup Mode. LED blinks slowly (2 seconds)
  • VCC: +5 Power
  • GND: System / Arduino Ground
  • TXD: Transmit Serial Data from HC-05 to Arduino Serial Receive. NOTE: 3.3V HIGH level: OK for Arduino
  • RXD: Receive Serial Data from Arduino Serial Transmit
  • STATE: Tells if connected or not

HC-06 Pins:

  • VCC: +5 Power
  • GND: System / Arduino Ground
  • TXD: Transmit Serial Data from HC-05 to Arduino Serial Receive. NOTE: 3.3V HIGH level: OK for Arduino
  • RXD: Receive Serial Data from Arduino Serial Transmit
  • STATE: Does not have this pin
  • KEY(EN): Does not have this pin.

AT command mode

AT command mode allows you to interrogate the Bluetooth module and to change some of the settings; things like the name, the baud rate, whether or not it operates in slave mode or master mode.

When used as a master device AT commands allow you to connect to other Bluetooth slave devices.

HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114 AT COMMANDS

Since the HC-05 FC-114s and the HC-06 FC-11s share the same Bolutek firmware the following should work on either module. The default setting on start up is SLAVE mode waiting for pairing or a connection and also accepting AT commands. This means it is fairly simply to start using AT commands.

There are 2 options for entering Master Mode:

  1. bring Pin 27 HIGH
  2. bring pin 28 HIGH

Pin 27 allows you to use software and pin 28 allows you to use a hardware switch. When pin 27 is HIGH you use AT commands to enter Master Mode. When pin 28 is HIGH (and pin 27 LOW or NC) the modules automatically switch to Master Mode.

Both ways are about the same so we will use pin 27 to enter Maste mode. Solder a wrap wire which is fine single core between pin 27 and the EN pin on the breakout board to get pin 27 HIGH. Pulling EN pin HIGH let us access AT Mode and does not have effect on the bluetooth module. The EN pin when brought LOW disables the module, same as with the ZS-040 bluetooth modules. It is up to you if you want to solder this wire or not. Remember that the pins on the mini bluetooth board are 3.3v only. So to pull pin 27 HIGH you need to use 3.3v not 5V. The EN pin is connected to a voltage divider (a 1k ohm resistor and a 2K ohm resistor) and then to 5V. The voltage divider reduces the 5V to 3.3v.

See BLK-MD-BC04-B At Command user guide for the AT commands.

HC-05 ZS-40 AT COMMANDS

HC-05 ZS-40 with EGBT-045MS Bluetooth module and the HC/Wavesen 2.0-20100601 firmware has different AT modes:

  • A full mode at 38400 baud.
  • A partial mode at 38400 baud.
  • A partial mode at the user settable baud rate.
  • A partial mini mode (even less commands work) at the user settable baud rate.

Most commands work when in any AT command mode but there are some commands that only work when pin34 is HIGH. It is recommended to use the full 38400 baud rate AT command mode.

To activate AT mode on the HC-05 zs-040 modules pin 34 needs to be HIGH on power up. The small push button switch on bluetooth module connects pin 34 to +3.3v so we can either:

  • 1. connect pin 34 directly to +3.3v and power on, or
  • 2. hold the button switch closed when starting the module.

1. Using the button switch to enter AT command mode using 38400 baud rate:

  1. Remove power from the module
  2. Hold the small button switch closed while powering on the module.
  3. Press and hold the button switch.
  4. While still holding the button switch closed, apply power.
  5. When you see the LED come on you can release the button switch.

Enters AT mode with the built in AT mode baud rate of 38400. The baud rate cannot be changed by the user.

This method allows the module to enter AT mode on start but but does not keep pin 34 HIGH and  (LOW or floating) some commands will not work and so, when using the button switch, you need to press and hold it closed when sending some commands.

2.If you are using AT command mode for any length of time, make a direct connection between pin 34 and +3.3v. Either solder a wire to the pin or use a clip.

Using pin 34 to enter full AT command mode using 38400 baud rate.

  1. Remove power from the module
  2. Make a connection between pin 34 and +3.3v
  3. Reapply power.

Enters AT mode with the built in AT mode baud rate of 38400. The baud rate cannot be changed by the user.

If you keep pin 34 HIGH you will enable the “full” AT mode which allows all AT commands to be used.

If you let pin 34 return LOW after power on then “mini” AT mode will be enabled.

See the full list of AT commands here.

HC-06 ZS-40 AT COMMANDS

The HC-06 is a slave only BT module that is fairly easy to use with the Arduino using serial communication. Once it is connected it simply relays what it receives by bluetooth to the Arduino and whatever it receives from the Arduino it sends to the connected device. There are several slightly different versions of the HC-06, however, all seem to use the same firmware and have the same AT commands.

The HC-06 enters AT mode when it is powered on. This is indicated by a rapidly flashing LED. After the HC-06 is connected to another device the LED stops flashing and is constant on.

We can use software serial to talk to bluetooth module and use the hardware serial for debugging. The Arduino is acting like a relay station between the serial monitor and the BT module. The HC-06s have a default baud rate of 9600. If 9600 doesn’t work try other speeds. 38400 is also very common. Once you have communication working you can change the baud rate to suit your needs. The HC-06 zs-040 expects commands to be in upper case and does not require carriage return and new line (\r\n) characters.

Build the circuit

The following picture shows the needed connections with the Arduino Uno 

There are a couple of common ways to connect the HC-05 to a computer; via a serial UART adapter or with an Arduino board. We will use an Arduino board.

1. HC-05 FC-114 and HC-06 FC-114


2. HC-05 ZS-40 and HC-06 ZS-40



Step by Step instruction

1. Testing HC-05 ZS-40

  1. Do wiring.
  2. Open Arduino IDE.
  3. Plug your Adruino Uno board into your PC and select the correct board and com port. The LED on the HC-05 should be blinking quickly at about 5 times a second.
  4. Open up serial monitor and set your baud to 9600 baud. The HC-05 expects commands to include a carriage return and newline characters (\r\n). You can add these automatically in the serial monitor by selecting “Both NL & CR” at the bottom of the window. You can also enter them manually in the form AT\r\n. If you forget to add carriage return and newline characters the HC-05 will not respond.
  5. Power off the bluetooth module before verifying and uploading the sketch (attached on the begining of the project description).
  6. Verify and upload the the sketch to your Adruino Uno board.
  7. We used the software serial on Arduino board pins 2 and 3 to talk to the HC-05. This means that we can still use the hardware serial to talk to the serial monitor on a host computer.
  8. If using the connection on pin 34, remove power, connect pin 34 to +3.3v and re-apply power to the bluetooth module HC-05.
  9. If using the button switch on bluetooth module HC-05, remove power, press and hold the button switch, re-apply power (while holding the button switch). When you see the LED come release the button switch.
  10. The LED should be blinking slowly on/off once every couple of seconds. This indicates AT mode.
  11. Open the serial monitor and check if AT commands are working - enter “AT” and press button Send.
  12. Check the firmware version - enter “AT+VERSION” and press button Send.
  13. Check for a list of the available AT commands here.
  14. Enter “AT+STATE” and press button Send. Returns the current state of the module: “+STATE:INITIALIZED OK”
  15. Enter “AT+ROLE” and press button Send. The possible values are ; 0 – Slave, 1 – Master, 2 – Slave-Loop. Returns “+ROLE:0 OK”. To change to Master Mode, enter “AT+ROLE=1” and press button Send. Will return “OK”. 
  16. Enter “AT+UART” and press button Send. Returns the baud rate used by the HC-05 in communication mode. The default for the modules is 9600. Returns: “+UART:9600,0,0 OK”. To change the baud rate to 38400 enter “AT+UART=38400,0,0”. Returns “OK”. Windows does not support baud rates above 115200. If you accidentally set the baud rate higher than 115200 you will not be able to use communication mode. You should still be able to enter AT mode at 38400 using method 1 or method 2 above and change the communication mode baud rate to something Windows can handle.
  17. Enter “AT+NAME” and press button Send. Querying the modules name with “AT+NAME?” only works in “full” At mode. If you cannot get “AT+NAME?” to work you need to bring pin34 HIGH. Changing the modules name with “AT+NAME=newname” works in “full” AT mode and “mini” AT mode. Returns “+NAME:HC-05 OK” (or something similar depending what your module is called)
  18. Some more commands that require pin 34 to be HIGH: “AT+INQ”, “AT+RNAME”. See the list of commands for other commands too.
  19. If you send AT command and do not get a response try to press the button above the EN pin on the bluetooth module and hold it pressed while you send the AT command. 

2. Testing HC-06 ZS-40

  1. Do wiring.
  2. Open Arduino IDE.
  3. Plug your Adruino Uno board into your PC and select the correct board and com port. The LED on the HC-06 should be blinking quickly at about 5 times a second.
  4. Open up serial monitor and set your baud to 9600 baud. You should select “No line ending” at the bottom of the window in serial monitor. If you will have other then  “No line ending” selected the HC-06 will not respond.

  5. Power off the bluetooth module before verifying and uploading the sketch.
  6. Verify and upload the the sketch to your Adruino Uno board (see attachments on the begining of the project).
  7. The HC-06 enters AT mode as soon it is powered on.
  8. Wait a little before openiong the serial monitor (approx. 10-20 seconds). Open the serial monitor and check if AT commands are working - enter “AT” and press button Send. Returns “OK”. AT is a basic communications test command that allows you to check the HC-06 is connected and communicating. If AT does not work try to enter it again in 10-15 seconds
  9. Check the firmware version - enter “AT+VERSION” and press button Send. Returns  "OKlinvorV1.8". Firmware versions linvorV1.8 or hc01.comV2.0 firmware are quite common for many HC-06s.
  10. Check the list of available commands here.
  11. Note: Windows cannot use baud rates above 115200. 

 

3. Testing HC-05 FC114

  1. Do wiring.
  2. Open Arduino IDE.
  3. Plug your Adruino Uno board into your PC and select the correct board and com port. The LED on the HC-05 should be blinking quickly at about 5 times a second.
  4. Open up serial monitor and set your baud to 9600 baud. The HC-05 expects commands to include a carriage return and newline characters (\r\n). You can add these automatically in the serial monitor by selecting “Both NL & CR” at the bottom of the window. You can also enter them manually in the form AT\r\n. If you forget to add carriage return and newline characters the HC-05 will not respond.
  5. Power off the bluetooth module before verifying and uploading the sketch (attached on the begining of the project description).
  6. Verify and upload the the sketch to your Adruino Uno board.
  7. We used the software serial on Arduino board pins 2 and 3 to talk to the HC-05. This means that we can still use the hardware serial to talk to the serial monitor on a host computer.
  8. Since the HC-05 FC-114s and the HC-06 FC-11s share the same Bolutek firmware the following should work on either module. The default setting on start up is SLAVE mode waiting for pairing or a connection and also accepting AT commands. This means it is fairly simply to start using AT commands.
    There are 2 options for entering Master Mode:
    bring Pin 27 HIGH
    bring pin 28 HIGH
    Pin 27 allows you to use software and pin 28 allows you to use a hardware switch. When pin 27 is HIGH you use AT commands to enter Master Mode. When pin 28 is HIGH (and pin 27 LOW or NC) the modules automatically switch to Master Mode.
    Since the HC-05 FC-114s and the HC-06 FC-11s share the same Bolutek firmware the following should work on either module. The default setting on start up is SLAVE mode waiting for pairing or a connection and also accepting AT commands. This means it is fairly simply to start using AT commands.
  9. There are 2 options for entering Master Mode:
    bring Pin 27 HIGH bring pin 28 HIGH Pin 27 allows you to use software and pin 28 allows you to use a hardware switch. When pin 27 is HIGH you use AT commands to enter Master Mode. When pin 28 is HIGH (and pin 27 LOW or NC) the modules automatically switch to Master Mode.
  10. Open the serial monitor and check if AT commands are working - enter “AT” and press button Send. Returns “OK”. AT is a basic communications test command that allows you to check the HC-05 is connected and communicating.
  11. Check the firmware version - enter “AT+VERSION” and press button Send.
  12. Check for a list of the available AT commands  - enter “AT+HELP”  and press button Send.
  13. If you send AT command and do not get a response try to press the button above the EN pin on the bluetooth module and hold it pressed while you send the AT command. 
  14. You can check the list of AT commands here.
  15. FC-114 boards have the Bolutek firmware and linvorV1.8 firmware. The testing was based on Bolutek firmware.

 

4. Testing HC-06 FC114

  1. Do wiring.
  2. Open Arduino IDE.
  3. Plug your Adruino Uno board into your PC and select the correct board and com port. The LED on the HC-05 should be blinking quickly at about 5 times a second.
  4. Open up serial monitor and set your baud to 9600 baud. The HC-05 expects commands to include a carriage return and newline characters (\r\n). You can add these automatically in the serial monitor by selecting “Both NL & CR” at the bottom of the window. You can also enter them manually in the form AT\r\n. If you forget to add carriage return and newline characters the HC-05 will not respond.
  5. Power off the bluetooth module before verifying and uploading the sketch (attached on the begining of the project description).
  6. Verify and upload the the sketch to your Adruino Uno board.
  7. We used the software serial on Arduino board pins 2 and 3 to talk to the HC-05. This means that we can still use the hardware serial to talk to the serial monitor on a host computer.
  8. Since the HC-05 FC-114s and the HC-06 FC-11s share the same Bolutek firmware the following should work on either module. The default setting on start up is SLAVE mode waiting for pairing or a connection and also accepting AT commands. This means it is fairly simply to start using AT commands.
  9. Open the serial monitor and check if AT commands are working - enter “AT” and press button Send. Returns “OK”. AT is a basic communications test command that allows you to check the HC-05 is connected and communicating.
  10. Check the firmware version - enter “AT+VERSION” and press button Send.
  11. Check for a list of the available AT commands  - enter “AT+HELP”  and press button Send.
  12. If you send AT command and do not get a response try to press the button above the EN pin on the bluetooth module and hold it pressed while you send the AT command. 
  13. You can check for the list of AT commands here.
  14. FC-114 boards have the Bolutek firmware and linvorV1.8 firmware. The testing was based on Bolutek firmware.

 

Summary

We have learnt about bluetooth modules HC-05 and HC-06 and how to connect them to Arduino board.

Library:

  • SoftwareSerial library included in Arduino IDE. The version of SoftwareSerial included in Arduino IDE 1.0 and later is based on the NewSoftSerial library by Mikal Hart. You can also read about it here

Sketch:

  • See attachments on the begining of this project description. 


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Published at 10-09-2017
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